FACTS ABOUT NORTHERN LIGHTS - Northern Lights Tromsø

Go to content

Main menu:

Diverse
FACTS ABOUT NORTHERN LIGHTS
It is possible to see the Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis is the scientific name, from September to March. However, no guarantee has not, for this depends on the particular meteorological conditions. The areas outside Tromsø is a fantastic starting point to experience the Northern Lights at their best.

Aurora Polaris (polar light) is a physical phenomenon that occurs when solar storms are stronger than usual, sending charged particles towards the Earth. The particles are electrons and protons that form light when they collide with gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. The polar light occurs at a height of 90 to more than 180 km above the Earth’s surface. This natural phenomenon may be observed in the night sky in a belt round the magnetic poles. The polar light appears as waves of light that vary in shape, colour and strength, from dark blue via green and yellow to red and orange. Polar light in the northern hemisphere is called Aurora Borealis or the Northern Lights, while polar light in the southern hemisphere is called Aurora Australis or the Southern Lights.

POPULAR BELIEF
When we talk about the Northern Lights with the ordinary man and woman in modern day Norway, it is surprising how often we hear that as children they waved to the natural light show with white clothes and believed that the strength of the movement of the Northern Lights increased as a result of their own waving.
2013 (c) Northern Lights Tromsø
Back to content | Back to main menu